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Pronunciation: Some letter sounds found in Yiddish are unknown in English, so letter combinations must be used to represent these sounds.The nominative definite articles are: Der, masculine; dos, neuter; and di, feminine (or plural).Thus dos punim means "the face" (neuter) and der birger is "the citizen" (masculine).The most common of these is the "ch" or "kh" sound found in German and Hebrew.Pronounce this like "Ba Contents copyright © 2004, 2018 Kehillat Israel Copyright details: individual definitions cannot be copyrighted but the entire collection of terms is protected.Below are some hints for recording a greeting: Yes, a Paid Membership may be used from any phone.Your Membership will continue as long as you remain active. Beam with joy, burst with pride, glow with pride and happiness, beam; be delighted; 2. exclaim joyfully or proudly, especially in boasting about the achievements of a family member. Those who spoke Litvisher Yiddish: Jews in Lithuania, Latvia, Belarus, and in the Suwałki region of NW Poland; 2. a person who speaks with a northeastern Yiddish accent Spelling: The Yiddish language is written using a variant of the Hebrew alphabet, thus the words are transliterated from their Hebrew spelling and many spelling versions exist for the same word.Also, different spelling versions exist because Yiddish pronunciation varied according to the region of the speaker: the main "dialects" were Litvak (Lithuanian) and Galitsianer (Galacian); some differences in pronunciation (and thus rendering into the Roman alphabet) were so great as to make speakers sometimes unintelligible to each other.In this Glossary an attempt has been made to use the most common spelling variant.If you can't find the word listed where you expected it, try looking for it using a related vowel or consonant, e.g., "tzores" (trouble) can be found under "tsores." Some of these alternate spellings are cross-listed.