Apple and stock option backdating

23 Dec

Free for (limited) use under a Creative Commons license. The INCOTERMS® are "a series of pre-defined com­mer­cial terms published by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) [that are] widely used in international commercial transactions …. the purpose of corroboration [is] to prevent fraud, by providing independent confirmation of the [witness's] testimony." See Sandt Technology, Ltd. Resco Metal & Plastics Corp., 264 F.3d 1344, 1350 (Fed. 2001) (affirming relevant part of summary judgment; internal quotation marks and citation omitted). (b) Except as otherwise stated below, for information to be considered Confidential Information, the information must: (1) be set forth (or summarized) in tangible form (including for example an electronic storage device); and (2) be marked with a reasonably-prominent, visually-readable notice such as (for example) "Confidential information of [name]" or "Subject to NDA." In assessing whether a disclosing party in fact maintained particular information in confidence, a court very likely will give significant weight to whether the disclosing party caused the information to be marked as confidential. In many situations, these "standard" precautions are likely to satisfy the disclosing party's desires, but for some types of Confidential Information, a disclosing party might want to insist on special precautions — especially in the era of criminal hackers, and even state actors, breaking into insufficiently-secure computer systems and stealing valuable information, such as happened to Sony Pictures Entertainment, allegedly at the hands of North Korea, and to Home Depot, which booked a charge of 1 million after a 2014 theft of customers' credit-card data. (1) will not waive or otherwise affect the Disclosing Party's ability to enforce its other intellectual-property rights (for example, copyrights and patents) against the Receiving Party except to the extent, if any, that the parties expressly agree otherwise in writing; and (2) will not affect any obligation of confidentiality imposed by law.

Both a contract drafter and a contract reviewer can save some time by first reviewing — together — the Common Draft short-form contract drafts (as well as other clause titles) and discussing just what types of provision they want in their document. The better approach is the one taken by this provision. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit explained this balancing concept in an analogous context, namely the patent-law requirement that claims of prior invention must be corroborated. 10, 2016) (affirming award of treble damages and trebled attorney fees; internal quotation marks omitted), quoting Washburn & Moen Mfg. Some language in this disclaimer is in all-caps bold-faced type so that the language will be conspicuous. A company's failure to do catch-up marking of confidential information after an oral disclosure to another party can kill the company's claim to trade-secret rights in the information. Compaq, the computer manufacturer Compaq (then part of Hewlett-Packard) defeated Convolve's claim that Compaq had misappropriated Convolve's trade secrets concerning hard-disk technology. A receiving party, though, might well object to this provision because it's necessarily vague, which could later lead to disputres about whether particular information qualified as "clearly" confidential.

The manufacturer and customer needn't bother negotiating the wording for those responsibilities. A requirement like this can be handy if the Receiving Party will be dealing with information whose distribution is restricted by law, for example personal health information or export-controlled information. The obligations of sec­tion 6.1.3 apply only during the Confidentiality-Obligation Period; during that time, though, those obligations will continue to apply to all Specimens of Confidential Information, even after any termination or expiration of the Agreement. of Confidential Information is any copy of, and any physical object embodying, Confidential Information — for example, any paper- or electronic copy and any specimen of hardware — where the copy or physical object is in the possession, custody, or control of: (i) the Receiving Party, and/or (ii) any individual or organization to which the Receiving Party made Confidential Information accessible.

Instead, they likely will "order from the menu" of the INCOTERMS 2010 publication: By specifying a standardized three-letter abbreviation — DDP, EXW, or whatever — the parties can quickly signal which of that publication's pre-defined terms and conditions they wish to use. This provision uses a prudent-measures standard instead of an absolute obligation. Disclosing parties will normally be reluctant to agree to a fixed confidentiality period. (b) IF: The Disclosing Party makes a seasonable written request following any termination or expiration of the Agreement; THEN: except as provided in sections 6.1.3.8 and (if applicable) 6.2.22, the Receiving Party will promptly: (1) return Specimens of Confidential Information to (i) the Disclosing Party, or (ii) another individual or organization designated in writing by the Disclosing Party; and (2) subject to sec­tion 6.1.3.9 (if applicable), destroy any Specimens not returned.

apple and stock option backdating-82

The sale results in a decrease in ACB equal to: All values must be converted into Canadian dollars, even if you’re using a foreign currency cash balance to make a purchase and even if you do not convert the proceeds from a sale into Canadian dollars.

[THIS SECTION IS BEING EXTENSIVELY "REMODELED" so that all the drafts are similar in format to the short-form confidentiality agreement. That would provide the receiving party with a bright-line sunset date as well as providing the disclosing party with a year or two of safety margin. (b) For the avoidance of doubt, any Specimen of Confidential Information not returned or destroyed remains subject to the Confidentiality Obligations.

] [NOTE: Don't rely on the drafts below as a substitute for legal advice about your specific situation. If the receiving party's confidentiality obligations are allowed to expire, the disclosing party might there­after find it difficult — or, more likely, impossible — to convince a court to enforce any trade-secret rights in the relevant information. A receiving party might find it to be tremendously burdensome and expensive to try to return or destroy all copies of a disclosing party's confidential information, even those in emails, backup systems, etc.

Un­less you say other­wise, I'll cred­it you in these mat­er­i­als for any sug­ges­tions that I in­corp­or­ate. The receiving party likely would prefer instead to have a bright-line "sunset," after which the receiving party can do whatever it wants without having to incur the burden of analyzing the facts and circumstances. SUGGESTION: Consider requiring segregation of Confidential Information — or a Receiving Party could elect to segregate Confidential Information on its own initiative, even without a contractual requirement — for easier compliance with this section.

Also, please sign up to be notified of updates (I won't spam you). A disclosing party might regard an expiration date for confidentiality obligations as acceptable, depending largely on: In that situation, the disclosing party might be willing to have the receiving party's confidentiality obligations expire in three or four years. (a) Specimens of Confidential Information need not be returned or destroyed to the extent that they are not reasonably capable of being readily located and segregated without undue burden or expense — for example, Confidential Information contained in email correspondence or electronic back-up systems.