Free trial ebony phone chat chinese dating site london

10 Dec

In a 2007 television interview, Davis said, "Herbert Marcuse taught me that it was possible to be an academic, an activist, a scholar, and a revolutionary." She worked part-time to earn enough money to travel to France and Switzerland before she attended the eighth World Festival of Youth and Students in Helsinki, Finland.

She returned home in 1963 to a Federal Bureau of Investigation interview about her attendance at the Communist-sponsored festival.

Events in the United States, including the formation of the Black Panther Party and the transformation of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to an all-black organization, drew her interest upon her return.

On her way back, Davis stopped in London to attend a conference on "The Dialectics of Liberation." The black contingent at the conference included the Trinidadian-American Stokely Carmichael and the British Michael X.

Consequently, Davis grew up surrounded by communist organizers and thinkers who significantly influenced her intellectual development.

Davis was involved in her church youth group as a child, and attended Sunday school regularly.

She supported the governments of the Soviet Bloc for several decades. Her family lived in the "Dynamite Hill" neighborhood, which was marked in the 1950s by the bombings of houses in an attempt to intimidate and drive out middle-class blacks who had moved into the area.

Davis attributes much of her political involvement to her involvement as a young girl in Birmingham with the Girl Scouts of the United States of America.

She also participated in the Girl Scouts 1959 national roundup in Colorado.

As a Girl Scout, she marched and picketed to protest racial segregation in Birmingham.

By her junior year in high school, Davis had applied to and was accepted at an American Friends Service Committee (Quaker) program that placed black students from the South in integrated schools in the North.