Interracial dating among college students

13 Dec

“It shows that people show some level of disgust based on the [national] polls saying that everything is fine,” said Allison Skinner, lead author and postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington, who published the study in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.Skinner said the students at the Midwestern university may not be representative of the entire nation, but she added that their feelings are “probably not exclusively a Nebraska thing.” About 1 in 8 people who married in 2013 tied the knot with someone of a different race, according to a Pew analysis of American Community Survey data.This study, however, found that dating preferences among females interviewed did not recognize physical appearance, such as light or dark skin preference and body-frame preference, as a significant factor for date selection.This finding is in contrast to existing literature.That’s about 12 percent, nearly double the share in 1980 when it was 6.7 percent.The study comes as the new movie “Loving” is set to debut in theaters in November.Most people in the United States say they accept interracial relationships, but a new study of brain activity shows some hidden bias.

But photos of interracial couples triggered activity in a part of the brain that registers disgust.

Viewers were then shown images of same-race couples, mixed couples and silhouettes of animals and humans and asked to press a button as quickly as possible to indicate which images showed animals or humans.

The study participants were faster to identify same-race couples as humans.

The respondents were about evenly split between the sexes; 87 percent were white, 5 percent were Latino, 3 percent were Asian, 3 percent black and 2 percent were of some other race.

As part of a longer survey, participants were also asked to rate on a scale of 1 to 100 how disgusted they felt about a black man in a romantic relationship with a white woman, or a white man in a relationship with a black woman.