Mandating use

08 Feb

Public employers, contractors and subcontractors with more than 100 employees (but less than 500) must use E-Verify on or before July 1, 2008 and public employers, contractors and subcontractors with fewer than 100 employees must use E-Verify on or before July 1, 2009.

HB 87 - Passed in 2011, HB 87 requires all private businesses with more than 10 employees to use E-Verify.

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Rhode Island Executive Order - In March 2008, Governor Carcieri issued an executive order requiring executive agencies to use E-Verify; and for all persons and businesses, including grantees, contractors and their subcontractors and vendors to use E-Verify. All private employers must comply by July 1, 2009 and all other all businesses by January 1, 2010.

Minnesota Executive Order - In January 2008, Governor Tim Pawlenty issued an executive order effective, January 29, 2008, stating that all hiring authorities within the executive branch of state government as well as any employer seeking to enter into a state contract worth in excess of ,000 must participate in the E-Verify program.

The executive order expired 90 days after Pawlenty left office. Tom Emmer offered and the State House approved an amendment requiring the mandatory use of E-Verify for anyone receiving funds from a

Rhode Island Executive Order - In March 2008, Governor Carcieri issued an executive order requiring executive agencies to use E-Verify; and for all persons and businesses, including grantees, contractors and their subcontractors and vendors to use E-Verify. All private employers must comply by July 1, 2009 and all other all businesses by January 1, 2010.

Minnesota Executive Order - In January 2008, Governor Tim Pawlenty issued an executive order effective, January 29, 2008, stating that all hiring authorities within the executive branch of state government as well as any employer seeking to enter into a state contract worth in excess of $50,000 must participate in the E-Verify program.

The executive order expired 90 days after Pawlenty left office. Tom Emmer offered and the State House approved an amendment requiring the mandatory use of E-Verify for anyone receiving funds from a $1 billion stimulus bill.

It was followed up in 2008 with HB 2745, which prohibits government contracts to any businesses not using E-Verify, effective May 1, 2008. Colorado HB 1343 - Passed in 2006, HB 1343 prohibits state agencies from entering into contract agreements with contractors who knowingly employ illegal aliens and requires prospective contractors use E-Verify to ensure legal work status of all employees.

In 2008, SB 193 was passed requiring contractors with state contracts to use E-Verify. Georgia SB 529 - Passed in 2006, SB 529 requires public employers, contractors and subcontractors with 500 or more employees to participate in E-Verify for all new employees, effective July 1, 2007.

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Rhode Island Executive Order - In March 2008, Governor Carcieri issued an executive order requiring executive agencies to use E-Verify; and for all persons and businesses, including grantees, contractors and their subcontractors and vendors to use E-Verify. All private employers must comply by July 1, 2009 and all other all businesses by January 1, 2010.Minnesota Executive Order - In January 2008, Governor Tim Pawlenty issued an executive order effective, January 29, 2008, stating that all hiring authorities within the executive branch of state government as well as any employer seeking to enter into a state contract worth in excess of $50,000 must participate in the E-Verify program.The executive order expired 90 days after Pawlenty left office. Tom Emmer offered and the State House approved an amendment requiring the mandatory use of E-Verify for anyone receiving funds from a $1 billion stimulus bill.It was followed up in 2008 with HB 2745, which prohibits government contracts to any businesses not using E-Verify, effective May 1, 2008. Colorado HB 1343 - Passed in 2006, HB 1343 prohibits state agencies from entering into contract agreements with contractors who knowingly employ illegal aliens and requires prospective contractors use E-Verify to ensure legal work status of all employees.In 2008, SB 193 was passed requiring contractors with state contracts to use E-Verify. Georgia SB 529 - Passed in 2006, SB 529 requires public employers, contractors and subcontractors with 500 or more employees to participate in E-Verify for all new employees, effective July 1, 2007.It provides an automated link to federal databases to help employers determine employment eligibility of new hires and the validity of their Social Security numbers.While its usage remains voluntary throughout the country, some states have passed legislation making its use mandatory for certain businesses.The phase-in period begins in October 2012 and runs through July 2013.Seasonal workers are not required to be verified through E-Verify. South Carolina HB 4400 - Passed in 2008, HB 4400 requires the mandatory use of E-Verify for all employers by July 1, 2010.Illinois HB 1774 - HB 1744 bars Illinois companies from enrolling in any Employment Eligibility Verification System until accuracy and timeliness issues are resolved.Illinois also enacted HB 1743, which creates privacy and antidiscrimination protections for workers if employers participating in E-Verify don’t follow the program’s procedures.

billion stimulus bill.

It was followed up in 2008 with HB 2745, which prohibits government contracts to any businesses not using E-Verify, effective May 1, 2008. Colorado HB 1343 - Passed in 2006, HB 1343 prohibits state agencies from entering into contract agreements with contractors who knowingly employ illegal aliens and requires prospective contractors use E-Verify to ensure legal work status of all employees.

In 2008, SB 193 was passed requiring contractors with state contracts to use E-Verify. Georgia SB 529 - Passed in 2006, SB 529 requires public employers, contractors and subcontractors with 500 or more employees to participate in E-Verify for all new employees, effective July 1, 2007.