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Key theoretical issues considered in this course include human-environmental interaction, the emergence of complexity, warfare, ritual and religion, trade, and identity. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject.

Finally, we will explore how new archaeological evidence and contemporary approaches have changed our perspectives on the peoples and lifeways of ancient North America and impacted our ethical responsibilities to their descendants. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor.

Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester.

Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ANTH 130 World Cultures (3 Hours) This introductory course will utilize an ethnographic approach to introduce students to various cultural and social practices of Westernized and non-Westernized cultures and societies from around the world.

This course will examine a wide range of topics including economic production, religion, world view, kinship patterns and political and economic institutions. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject.

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An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. ANTH 134 Native Americans (3 Hours) This ethnographic course will introduce students to the indigenous peoples and First Nations of North, Central and South America, with particular attention being paid to North America. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. This course will focus on selected First Nations cultures and societies to examine a wide range of topics including arts, oral traditions, religions, and Indian-White relations. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Identify and utilize quantitative research methodologies. Students will create and implement their own research design in the context of on-going investigations. Emphasis will be placed on practicing the essential skills needed to conduct archaeological research. (1-7 Hour) Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval. Students will also look at how linguistic anthropologists use methods in the field to analyze language use. ANTH 205 Archaeological Field Methods (5 Hours) This course is a practicum of archaeological field methods and techniques. At the conclusion of this course, students will see how race, ethnicity, gender and other cultural identities are expressed through language. The fundamental principles of archaeological research will be considered. Lectures, discussions, readings and films will be used to accomplish the aforementioned, as well as optional trips to local locations associated with the paranormal and supernatural. Western and non-Western cultures will be considered. This course is an introduction to the interaction between language and culture. This course will consider topics such as medical beliefs and curing practices, disease and nutrition, the connection between inequality and health disparities, and how to apply medical anthropological concepts to real-world problems. We will explore the various ways humans communicate and analyze how these modes of communication reflect social and cultural identities. Principal Anthropological Theories and Frameworks A. Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Identify and comprehend the core concepts of cultural anthropology.