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06 Jan

Still, characters seem to just come and go, rather than synergizing as one tight ensemble.The second half also falls back on crowd-pleasing melodrama, weaving in showy chase scenes (in which Kim Jung-nam is framed in a Christ-like visual trope).Jang evokes the liberating sensation of defiance as more people rise up.He also juxtaposes the heart-wrenching hysteria of Yong-chul’s family at the morgue with a quiet moment of bleak poetry when the father scatters his ashes on a frozen lake.Sang-gil initially thinks that it was an accident, but dog ...See full summary » Dae-Ho is an unproductive bank clerk who is late to work every morning and the object of his manager's frustrations.In the fight for human rights and democracy, a single spark can ignite a mighty flame, as illustrated by “1987: When the Day Comes,” a star-studded, fact-based political thriller that reconstructs a turning point in South Korean history triggered by the death of a student.

See full summary » A light hearted action noir about a part time gangster who tries to be a full time daddy and wants to live a peaceful life with his family despite of being in trouble almost all the time, due to his profession.As rabid Commie-hater Director Park Jeol-won (Kim Yoon-seok) steps in to pull his weight over police and court, Choi finds his sense of mission, tipping off journalist Yoon (Lee Hee-jun), whose front-page report whips up a storm.In a way, the excesses of authoritarianism are personified by Kim’s bravura performance as Park, who swings from smug to hysterical, gripping viewers with disgust and pity in one electrifying confessional scene.About Nae-kyung who is able to assess the personality, mental state and habits of a person by looking at his face.Because of his abilities, he gets involved in a power struggle between Prince Sooyang and Kim Jong-Seo.On their Journey they find a Journal from another expedition group 80 years ago..members as well.The hard journey and unbearable cold is driving them to limits and they are witnessing strange things. Well, this film has gotten very negative reviews, and I don't think that's all righteous.The ambitious screenplay by Kim Kyung-chan encompasses a wide spectrum of Korean society: government, police, jurisdiction, press, prison, religious institutions, dissidents, labor unions, and academia — each contributed to the chain of events triggered by college student Park Yong-chul’s death by torture inside the Anti-Communist Investigations Bureau (ACIB) on Jan. Like a symphony that starts with a solo in the first movement, the story focuses on a singular act of resistance by Prosecutor Choi (“The Tunnel” star Ha Jung-woo) when called on by ACIB officers to sign a warrant authorizing the student’s instant cremation without an autopsy.It’s illegal, of course, but standard precedure under President Chun Doo-hwan’s dictatorship, where summary execution is commonplace.Attention turns to correctional officer Han Byung-Yoo, who struck up such jocular rapport with Song Kang-ho in “A Taxi Driver” more than rises up to this pivotal role, infusing both warmth and grit to an earthy grass-roots stereotype.Unfortunately, so much plot advancement is pegged to Han that he functions mostly as a technical device, rather than forming engaging relationships.