University of alabama interracial dating

01 Jan

After reviewing this material and reading the associated articles, the reader should have a strong understanding of the issues surrounding children of interracial marriages, and the problems parents encounter with their mixed race children. This author goes back in history and talks about the past views of interracial marriages and the justifications for its criminal penalties. In this article, Peter Wallenstein goes into great detail of the evolution of interracial marriages in Alabama and Virginia.

In addition, the reader should have a better understanding of the history of interracial marriages. Children in Interracial Homes, Marriage Across the Color Line (1965). Racial Purity and Interracial Sex in the Law of Colonial and Antebellum Virginia, 77 Geo. Even though this article is used as a comparison between interracial and same-sex marriages, it gives a vivid history of interracial marriages and how the children of these marriages were viewed by society. First, the author talks about the origins of laws against interracial marriages in Alabama.

This annotated bibliography will attempt to overview the history of interracial marriages and the children born out of such relationships.

More specifically it will focus on how these marriages have affected the children throughout history and the effects interracial marriages have on children.

If the person looked Black or mixed, the burden was on the person to prove they were White and entitled to such rights and privileges.22 The author next goes into the concern over the production of mixed race children.

university of alabama interracial dating-21

Sixty-one percent of White Americans are more likely to approve of such marriages today, compared to 4% in 1958.8 In addition, according to the U. Census Bureau, one in fifty marriages are interracial which is four times the number compared to 1970.9 Interracial marriages can include the union of Asians, Hispanics, Blacks, Whites, and any other group. The third justification was based on popular belief that children of interracial marriages were mentally and physically inferior to pure White race children.12 These racist beliefs concerning the inferiority of mixed race children were not confined to the uneducated masses.The author gives three reasons for the recognition and teaching to children: the consciousness of racial identity is unavoidable in this society; if we do teach our children about these realities they can grow up proud, happy, self-confident, and can recognize and resist the messages of racism; and that in America today people of all backgrounds will continue to be damaged by the very concrete effects of racism as long as it permeates our society.26 The author goes on to strictly analyze the second way to effectively counter racism-create interracial families. 34 Paul Rosenblatt, Terri Karis, & Richard Powell, Children, Multiracial Couples, 197 (1995). The advocates of this theory say that family relationships hold the key to the resolution of racial conflicts and if family ties make it across racial lines we will more quickly consume racism than by any other force.27 However, this argument is flawed because our schools, social lives, and any other aspect of life, are so frequently segregated that interracial couples must make constant choices about which communities to participate in, and multiracial children are continually confronted by questions of cultural and racial identity. With classification, people were given certain rights and privileges.If a person was White, they received the rights and privileges; if they were Black or of the mixed race they received nothing.With the new laws, more people were fined, the penalties were higher, and now the bastard child would be bound as a servant until the age of 31. The author starts out this article by stating there is no better place to examine prohibitions on interracial sex and marriage as Virginia.Then in 1765 Virginia's legislature relaxed the terms of their laws in only one aspect-children born after this year would only be subject to servantry for 21 years if they were male and 18 years if female.19 Up until the 1960's, the laws against interracial marriages stayed on the books. Many people see Virginia as the "mother of Presidents" (four of the first five Presidents were from Virginia), and the "mother of Revolutionaries" such as Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, and Patrick Henry.20 However, Virginia was also the leader of slavery and one of the first colonies to formulate a legal definition of race.The Supreme Court case, which directly speaks to this topic, is Loving v. In 1958 Richard Loving and Mildred Jeter married in Washington, D. and returned to Virginia together as husband and wife. The problem arose in that since 1961 Virginia banned interracial marriages.The Lovings were prosecuted under a statute enacted in 1924 entitled "An Act to Preserve Racial Integrity."1 The statute said that in Virginia no White person could marry anyone other than a white person.2 The law made it a crime not only to enter into an interracial marriage in the State of Virginia, but it also criminalized interracial marriages outside the state with the intent of evading Virginia's prohibition.3 Furthermore the law stated that children born out of such a union were deemed in the eyes of the State to be illegitimate and without the protections and privileges accorded to the children of lawfully wedded parents. This article compares the history of interracial marriages with that of same-sex marriages.As time progressed the fines and penalties decreased, but their historical effects on children were severe and long lasting. After slavery was abolished the Virginians needed other mechanisms to preserve racial hierarchy and so laws regarding interracial sex and marriage were introduced.The article does an excellent job of laying out the history of interracial marriages, the politics, laws, and court systems behind such marriages, and how the law viewed mixed race children. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Racial Purity and Interracial Sex in the Law of Colonial and Antebellum Virginia, 77 Geo. The author states there are two basic concerns which lead to the laws on interracial sex and marriage: maintenance of a clear boundary line in a society that was based on slavery; the protection of involuntary interracial sex (rape).21 A statutory definition of race arose because of one essential factor-how should the mixed race offspring of these couples be classified.